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Goldy Luck and the three pandas
2014
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Author Notes
"In this Chinese American retelling of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," a careless Goldy Luck wreaks havoc on the home of a family of panda bears. She eats up the littlest panda's rice porridge, breaks his rocking chair, and rumples all the blankets on his futon. When Goldy takes responsibility for her actions, she makes a new friend (and a whole plate of turnip cakes!) just in time for Chinese New Year."
First Chapter or Excerpt
When Goldy Luck was born, her mother said, "Year of the Golden Dragon--very lucky year. This child will have good luck." "She has a face as round as a gold coin," said her father. "This child will bring great wealth." But Goldy had neither great wealth nor good luck. In fact, she could never seem to keep money in her piggy bank, and she had a bad habit of breaking things. Excerpted from Goldy Luck and the Three Pandas by Natasha Yim All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
Fiction/Biography Profile
Genre
Fiction
Juvenile
Topics
Chinese Americans
Family
Bears
Pandas
Chinese New Year
Large Cover Image
Trade Reviews

  Publishers Weekly Review

Having set out to transpose the story of Goldilocks into the key of the Chinese New Year, Yim (Otto's Rainy Day) turns in a solid performance. The forest becomes a Chinese neighborhood, the bears become pandas, the porridge becomes congee (rice porridge), and the errand becomes Goldy Luck's delivery of turnip cakes to the parents of her friend Little Chan. "He never shares stuff with me," Goldy Luck grumbles, and her mother replies, "Wash away old arguments and be nice, or you'll have bad luck." Zong's (Orange Peel's Pocket) paintings provide additional information about life in a Chinese family with close looks at scenes inside both houses; there's even a household altar with offerings placed before a picture of a panda ancestor. In Goldilocks tradition, Goldy Luck wreaks havoc and the Chans discover her: "Look. It's Goldy Luck, sleeping on my futon!" The images and story emphasize family life, cooperation, security, and warmth, while author's notes explain Chinese notions of good fortune and the Chinese zodiac system, and supply a recipe for turnip cake. Ages 4-8. Author's agent: Karen Grencik, Red Fox Literary. Illustrator's agent: Studio Goodwin Sturges. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

  School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 4-The retelling of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" is set in a Chinese urban landscape, where Goldy Luck is not living up to her name. The story begins with a Chinese New Year celebration, and Goldy's mom wakes her up so she can bring turnip cakes to the neighbors. After sampling their porridge (congee) and wrecking their furniture, Goldy settles into the bed of Little Chan, a panda who is not good at sharing. The Chan panda family arrives home, and when Goldy awakes, she runs out, embarrassed. Her sense of decency gets the better of her, and she returns to make amends. The story's simple, sweet, but didactic. The illustrations are bright, alluring, with Chinese cultural references. The DVD should be coupled with the actual picture book, because the text includes information about the Chinese New Year, which is lacking in the video. For example, children may wonder why losing a red envelope is so heartbreaking for Goldy. This is a supplemental purchase to primary programs that want to enhance their folklore or Chinese cultural collections.-Pamela Schembri, Newburgh Enlarged City School District, NY (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Booklist Review

It's Chinese New Year, and Goldy Luck's mother sends her to visit the Chan family with freshly cooked turnip cakes. As in the traditional Goldilocks story, the family of three bears (here pandas) are away, so Goldy eats Little Chan's congee, breaks his chair, falls asleep on his futon, and flees when the Chans return. Feeling guilty, Goldy Luck returns to the Chans with a bowl of hot congee to make amends, and the story ends as Goldy eats turnip cakes with the Chans. Cartoon-style illustrations add Chinese American elements to the story, such as the exchange of red envelopes, lanterns hanging above a rug with the Chinese zodiac, and a New Year's parade passing by. This composite of Goldilocks and Chinese New Year sometimes feels forced, but the Chinese American trappings provide an entertaining variation for seasonal storytimes. An author's note explaining customs and a recipe for turnip cakes are appended.--Perkins, Linda Copyright 2014 Booklist

  Horn Book Review

This entertaining Goldilocks takeoff is set during the Chinese New Year celebration, when Goldy Luck takes a gift to her panda neighbors. Familiar incidents follow--featuring (rice) porridge, a broken chair, and a nap--all portrayed with zest in the illustrations. In an ending that suits the setting, Goldy has second thoughts and returns to apologize. New Year facts and a turnip cake recipe are included. (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

  Kirkus Review

Goldy Luck, not an especially lucky child, is awoken by her mother one Chinese New Year and sent to the neighbors' to wish them "Kung Hei Fat Choi" and deliver a plate of turnip cakes. Tired and hungry, and thinking of the neighbor boy who doesn't share, she is reluctant, but she takes her mother's advice seriously: To avoid bad luck in the new year, she must resolve arguments and be kind. Though no one is home at the Chans', she enters--and drops the cakes. In trying to clean up, she follows the typical "Goldilocks" storyline, eating the Chans' congee, breaking a chair, falling asleep in a bed. When the Chans (anthropomorphized pandas) return home, the embarrassed Goldy runs away, but her conscience gets the better of her. In a moral addendum, Goldy returns to the Chans' to put things right, forming a friendship with Little Chan in the process. Zong's acrylic illustrations bring Goldy's culture to life through small details in the households as well as the Chinese New Year parade glimpsed through the doors and windows, though some of the details (Mr. Chan's massage chair) may seem stereotypical. An author's note explains more about Chinese New Year and is followed by a chart, unfortunately yearless, of the Chinese zodiac and concludes with a recipe for turnip cakes. A welcome Chinese addition to the fairy-tale shelf. (Picture book. 4-8)]]]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
Summary
"In this Chinese American retelling of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," a careless Goldy Luck wreaks havoc on the home of a family of panda bears. She eats up the littlest panda's rice porridge, breaks his rocking chair, and rumples all the blankets on his futon. When Goldy takes responsibility for her actions, she makes a new friend (and a whole plate of turnip cakes!) just in time for Chinese New Year."
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